Health Encyclopedia
Diseases and Conditions
Injuries
Nutrition
Poisons
Special Topics
Surgeries
Symptoms
Tests

Menu Font Size

Diseases and Conditions

Adam logo

Caput succedaneum


Definition Alternative Names Causes, incidence, and risk factors Symptoms Signs and tests Treatment Expectations (prognosis) Complications Calling your health care provider References

Definition

Caput succedaneum is swelling of the scalp in a newborn. It is most often brought on by pressure from the uterus or vaginal wall during a head-first (vertex) delivery.

Alternative Names

Caput

Causes, incidence, and risk factors

A caput succedaneum is more likely to form during a long or hard delivery. It is more common after the membranes have broken. This is because the amniotic sac is no longer providing a cushion for the baby's head. Vacuum extraction done during a difficult birth can also increase the chances of a caput succedaneum.

Caput succedaneum

A caput succedaneum may be detected by prenatal ultrasound even before labor or delivery begins. It has been found as early as 31 weeks of pregnancy. Very often, this is due to an early rupture of the membranes or too little amniotic fluid. It is less likely that a caput will form if the membranes stay intact.

Symptoms

  • Soft, puffy swelling on the scalp in a newborn infant
  • Possible bruising or color change on the scalp swelling
  • Swelling that may extend to both sides of the scalp
  • Swelling that is most often seen on the portion of the head which presented first
  • Increase in molding of the bones of the head

Signs and tests

The doctor will look at the swelling to confirm that it is a caput succedaneum. No other testing is needed.

Treatment

No treatment is needed. The problem usually goes away on its own within a few days.

Expectations (prognosis)

Complete recovery can be expected. The scalp will go back to a normal shape.

Complications

Complications may include a yellow color to the skin (jaundice).

Calling your health care provider

Most of the time, the problem is noticed right after birth. You do not need to call your doctor unless you have other questions.

References

Mangurten HH. Birth Injuries. In: Fanaroff AA, Martin RJ, eds. Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine: Diseases of the Fetus and Infant. 9th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Mosby Elsevier; 2010.

Physician Reference

International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision (ICD9)
767.19
Review Date: 5/10/2013
Reviewed By: Neil K. Kaneshiro, MD, MHA, Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc., Editorial Team: David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, Stephanie Slon, and Nissi Wang.

A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows rigorous standards of quality and accountability. A.D.A.M. is among the first to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A.M.'s editorial policy, editorial process and privacy policy. A.D.A.M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch).

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only - they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. Copyright 2009 A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.

 

Related Information
Caput succedaneum